Monthly Archives: April 2018

Antenatal corticosteroids and premature births

Women at risk of having their babies prematurely are sometimes given corticosteroids and evidence shows that they reduce miscarriages and deaths. In this study of 301 women Chase R. Cawyer, from the University of Alabama, led a team of researchers … Continue reading

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Vitamin D levels in newborns and association with neonatal hypocalcemia

Abstract Objective: Vitamin D has many important functions in our body. Especially in intrauterine and early infancy periods, Vitamin D plays a major role in bone development, growth, and the maturation of tissues such as lung and brain. Fetus is … Continue reading

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Hearing loss among high-risk newborns admitted to a tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Abstract Purpose: The aim of this work is to identify the most significant risk factors for hearing impairment in high risk neonates hospitalized at our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and to assess the sensitivity of hearing screening tests. Methods: … Continue reading

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Implementing a Systematic Process for Consistent Nursing Care in a NICU: A Quality Improvement Project

Abstract Aim: The global aim of this quality improvement project was to develop and implement a systematic process to assign and maintain consistent bedside nurses for infants and families. Methods: A systematic process based on a primary care nursing model … Continue reading

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NICU staff and patient experience – what do staff think about it?

Children looked after in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often experience pain, separation from their parents and stress. In this study Amy L. D’Agata, from the University of Rhode Island, led a team of researchers who interviewed people who … Continue reading

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Poorly children and traumatized parents

In this study Francesca Bevilacqua, from the Bambino Gesu hospital in Rome, led a team of researchers looking into the effects of babies having to have very early operations for congenital abnormalities on parents’ mental health six months and a … Continue reading

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Is earlier better for Caesareans?

In this study Emily S. Miller, from the Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, led a team of researchers comparing delivery at 37 weeks to delivery at 39 weeks in a sample of women who had already had three or … Continue reading

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