Monthly Archives: October 2016

Teaching junior doctors to screen for brain disease

This study looked into the effectiveness of using video clips to screen new-born babies for brain diseases. Junior doctors specialising in paediatrics were shown one-minute video clips demonstrating examination finding in new-born babies with, and without, brain problems. The clips … Continue reading

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Boosting babies’ blood sugar

New-born babies can suffer from low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) which can increase a baby’s risk of brain damage or developmental delay. Usually babies with low blood sugar are helped by having extra feeding with formula milk or being admitted to … Continue reading

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Compassion fatigue in the NICU

This study looked into levels of compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction – a feeling of professional fulfilment gained from helping others – in NICU staff. It found that the prevalence of compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction was 15.7%, … Continue reading

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Big, small or average. Which babies do best?

Babies come in all shapes and sizes and this study looked at how this affected their odds of death and illness. Compared with babies who were an average size for their gestational age (AGA) babies who were small for their … Continue reading

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Racial differences in satisfaction with NICU care

This study looked into the differences between black and white parents’ satisfaction with care on neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). 249 families took part in the study 52% of them were white and 42% of them black. On the whole … Continue reading

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Improving communications in the NICU

Not surprisingly parents of children in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) want as much communication as possible about how their child is getting on. One way of doing this is by text messages. M.F. Weems led a team of researchers … Continue reading

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Premature babies more prone to virus infections

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes chest infections and is the leading cause of hospitalizations among children under one in the U.S. This study – led by K.K. McLaurin, from AstraZeneca in Gaithersburg, Maryland – looked at whether premature babies are … Continue reading

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